The Great Equations

“Wry, probing, philosophically inclined, this book takes readers on a tour through ten great equations – ten of the most important victories in our long struggle to understand the world we live in.”
Charles C. Mann

J. Robert Oppenheimer: A Life, by Abraham Pais with Robert P. Crease

“The final chapters…written by Crease are such…that one wishes he’d produced a biography of his own.”
Publishers Weekly

The Prism and the Pendulum

“Each chapter has its own special feel and delectations, and all of them bring out that beauty, for scientists, is no less important than truth, and that one can be ravished by an experiment no less than by a work of art.”
Oliver Sacks

Making Physics

“A very readable, well illustrated, and sometimes even racy recounting of Brookhaven’s history, politics, and personalities… The book is often surprisingly forthright, without sparing any blushes.”
Denys Wilkinson

The Second Creation

“An absolutely marvelous book.
No one who cares about science should miss reading it.” Timothy Ferris

“Without qualification, this is the best account of the phenomenal story of physics in the twentieth century.” Dick Teresi

What Things Do,
by Peter-Paul Verbeek, translated by Robert P. Crease.

“This is really a good book. The goal is
to advance our philosophical
and cultural understanding of artifacts or material culture.”
Carl Mitcham

The Philosophy of Expertise

“A first-rate collection…Their anthology will justifiably become
the reference of choice for those interested in expertise.”
Ben Almassi, Ethics

Peace & War, by Robert Serber with Robert P. Crease.

“You can hardly know American physics in W. W. II or the Cold War, nor its hopes and burdens right into the present, without weighing what Bob Serber says.”
Phillip Morrison, MIT

The Philosophy of Expertise

“A first-rate collection…Their anthology will justifiably become
the reference of choice for those interested in expertise.”
Ben Almassi, Ethics

Peace & War, by Robert Serber with Robert P. Crease.

“You can hardly know American physics in W. W. II or the Cold War, nor its hopes and burdens right into the present, without weighing what Bob Serber says.”
Phillip Morrison, MIT